Hey honey...






Lou Reed said it well:
Little Joe never once gave it away
Everybody had to pay and pay
A hustle here and a hustle there
New York City is the place where they said
"Hey babe, take a walk on the wild side
I said hey Joe, take a walk on the wild side
We were driving from Dallas to Shreveport when this song came up on the mix I had created in my phone. It's funny all the things that cross your mind when you're in a three hour trip through the Southern United States. First of all, trying to decipher all the redneck fashion statements. Those cars! Really. Between the huge tires and the brass balls, I did not know where to look. And don't get me started with what some people were wearing. But then you start noticing other things. And that's when the wheels get to spin.

There's the diversity: people of color really are in some kind of bind in southern states. They're either circumscribed to the ghetto or work in service. And it's not the first time I've noticed this. When I've been to New Orleans and Nashville it's been pretty much the same. What the hell? Living in the midwest and operating in a realm where equity and equality are paramount really has twisted my vision of what race is in the United States.

Same thing with gay rights. Even though you'll always find the gay bars and gay-friendy businesses in big cities, when you hit the road is when you notice how life should be for gay people living in the small towns of the US. I cannot fathom what coming out or even just establishing relationships could be for them. We are not all in New York or Chicago or Philly or L.A. We are not Holly or Candy or Jackie or Little Joe. We don't get to go to New York and be the subjects of songs or take part in films or just get to be ourselves when we grow up in an environment where the Baptist Churches are closer and more abundant than WalMart stores. For LGBTQ people in these small town and hamlets life is surely not easy. We should count our blessings. Every day.

So yeah. Lou Reed's song brought all of this to my head. Told you I overthink everything. Well, that and images of Joe DAllessandro in all his glory. When I lived in Pittsburgh I got to see the Warhol film with him and could understand how being that attractive and having such mojo would make him the subject of such admiration. So I added him to this post. Because at the end of the day, this year is going to be one that looks at things from a positive perspective. I'm ready to take that walk, Lou.

xoxo









Comments

  1. HELL-o! I just climbed outta bed and then I see THIS! now THAT'S how I want a man to come to me! joe could use a little chest fur, but that nether region! so nicely manscaped! ay carumba!

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  2. I Consider myself lucky. I grew up in Harrisburg not by any means a large city, but it was cool how being gay was excepted there. I was out in high school with no issue.

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  3. Not being well traveled, I couldn’t imagine the difficulties POC and the queer community encounter in the south. Though things are better in the Chicago area, there are still large pockets on the south and west sides that are hell holes. And once things begin to turn around in those areas, gentrification begins and the long time residents are driven out, only to take up residence in another hell hole.

    So while things are “better” there’s still a long way to go. And for the queer community, while making inroads, danger lurks around the corner emboldened by the shit head in the White House. So let’s hope 2019 ends up being a better year.

    XOXO ­čĹĘ‍❤️‍­čĺő‍­čĹĘ

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  4. I think its easy to forget that those who live in southern states do not enjoy the same freedom we do in northern, metropolitan areas.

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