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200 years old




I have always known that John was right when he said that many gay men love looking into other people's homes to admire their dècor or just to see the way they live (hey Bob heeyy). I think that by this point it may be an atavistic trait. You have no idea how many times I find myself going down the rabbit hole watching one video after another of people taking us into their homes. The thing is, sometimes the people they profile are infinitesimally more interesting that the fab abodes they show off. And I think that's what keeps me coming back for more. 

Take for example this couple. Sydney and Tom. (And Skippy!) OMG I want to visit with them and have them tell me all kinds of stories. I'd live. I think they've been together forever. They've apparently traveled literally to every continent Córcega? Bogotá? I like their mantra when decorating: 'We don't decorate, we don't like matchy-match'. I like that. There's a lot of 'spaces' where two thriving adults can get away from each other. Because I've come to think that that's part of what being in a relationship is: being able to get away from each other and then meet again. Hey, it's apparently worked very well for them...

The idea of living in a 200 year old house in Georgetown sounds intriguing. I find the small rooms and the narrow, steep stairs super charming. Can you imagine the history of that house? Also, they have a rotary phone! And then they go on about how the phone company has not had a press release disclosing that we cannot use rotary phones anymore!!! I so want to hang out with them....

And what about the story about re-doing the dining room floor? I live! Houses are made by the people who live in them. No question about that.

XOXO

Comments

  1. That is an an amazing house. No, an amazing HOME. It’s lived in, it has history. They have filled it with their treasures and stories. Remembrances of travels and childhood. They have the ability to be together and to have their separate spaces. And the artifacts they found under the floorboards. I laughed when they mentioned “we didn’t find any bones.” Like you, I could listen to their stories forever.

    XOXO 👨‍❤️‍💋‍👨

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It is a home. Totally. That's the vibe I got.
      And I also laughed so hard when they mentioned the bones! OMG priceless.

      XOXO

      Delete
  2. I think personal histories are priceless. Folks can't help but be interesting when they share about their lives... and not in a youtube influencer way. No. I can't support that mindset. Too monetary for my taste. This was sweet. Thanks for sharing. And no... this house? Not for me. Too closed in. It's like living in a nicely kept antiques store.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely. Well , these stories come across as much more felt, much more intimate. We feel they're authentic. And yeah. That house is absolutely 200 years old. People lived differently then.

      XOXO

      Delete
  3. Living in such a beautiful 200 year old house, and so well maintained, I think it's wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too!
      I'm sure they'll eventually sell it and go live in Connecticut or someplace like that. But it should be a historical monument. I'm sure they'll preserve it.

      XOXO

      Delete
  4. I love their stories, and I love their house, but I could never live in such tiny spaces. And they have so much "stuff'" that I know they love and have stories about finding, but it's sensory overload!!
    That staircase alone gives me shivers; imagine trying to go up or down with three cats and a dog following! I'd be dead at the bottom.
    The story about Ghirardelli and the painting he made of himself was fabulous!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The stories are everything.
      And they do like their stuff. I guess it comes with the territory. Also old money.
      Hahaha I can imagine tuxedo going up and down the stairs!!

      Delete
  5. Great old house. They seem like a fun couple, and it would be amazing to spend time with them and hearing more stories of their lives. The Ghirardelli story, though. Wow. But, well, you knew he had to come from money what with all the world traveling and bein gable to ship large items back tot he states. But I couldn't spend more than 10 minutes in that house. Between the small rooms and the amount of tchatches, I'd be beside myself to get out. where I could see father than 10 feet and breathe. 😊 XOXO

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They do seem like they are a riot! That stage of life when you finish each other's sentences and all that. And yes, that's old money right there. They've been all over the world.
      And the house indeed is full. They like their books and things. It's super charming, though.

      XOXO

      Delete
  6. A charming video! I love to visit homes like that where every item has a fascinating back-story. But it would drive me mental to actually live there -- all that clutter! And I pity whoever they hire to do the dusting.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. OMG same!
      The stories, though. Everything had a story. And they do have tons of stuff. I'm sure they have a cleaning service. For sure.

      XOXO

      Delete
  7. The RUGS! I'm a whore for rugs.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes!
      And I bet those are the real thing. Really. No IKEA in that house.
      And I love IKEA! LOL

      XOXO

      Delete
  8. That was very entertaining... oh, and it's Corsica.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. They are super engaging! Very personable.
      HAHAHA I think I get carried away when writing names in Spanish, huh?

      XOXO

      Delete
  9. Great find, Sixpence. Thanks for sharing. When I first started dating Mrs. Shife, her family had a rotary phone and it was shocking to see something like that in 1997. They eventually had to get it replaced but we all remember it.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh, I knew I had to post about them. So charming!
      And I think in 1997 land lines could still support rotary phones. Funny how quaint that feels, no?

      XOXO

      Delete

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